10 Best Books On Training And Development

Updated on: February 2021

Best Books On Training And Development in 2021


The Happiest Baby on the Block; Fully Revised and Updated Second Edition: The New Way to Calm Crying and Help Your Newborn Baby Sleep Longer

The Happiest Baby on the Block; Fully Revised and Updated Second Edition: The New Way to Calm Crying and Help Your Newborn Baby Sleep Longer
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2021
  • Learn the secrets for making babies happy.
  • Dr. Karp found there IS a remedy for colic.
  • A innovative and thought-provoking reevaluation of early infancy.
  • Blends modern science and ancient wisdom.
  • Developed 4 basic principles to understand babies

Faculty Development in the Health Professions: A Focus on Research and Practice (Innovation and Change in Professional Education (11))

Faculty Development in the Health Professions: A Focus on Research and Practice (Innovation and Change in Professional Education (11))
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2021

Return on Investment (ROI) Basics

Return on Investment (ROI) Basics
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2021

10 Things Employers Expect Their Employees To Know: A Soft Skills Training Workbook

10 Things Employers Expect Their Employees To Know: A Soft Skills Training Workbook
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2021
  • Array

The Happiest Toddler on the Block: How to Eliminate Tantrums and Raise a Patient, Respectful, and Cooperative One- to Four-Year-Old: Revised Edition

The Happiest Toddler on the Block: How to Eliminate Tantrums and Raise a Patient, Respectful, and Cooperative One- to Four-Year-Old: Revised Edition
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2021
  • Array

Product Development and Management Body of Knowledge: A Guidebook for Training and Certification

Product Development and Management Body of Knowledge: A Guidebook for Training and Certification
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2021

Return on Investment in Training and Performance Improvement Programs, Second Edition (Improving Human Performance)

Return on Investment in Training and Performance Improvement Programs, Second Edition (Improving Human Performance)
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2021

Training on Trial: How Workplace Learning Must Reinvent Itself to Remain Relevant

Training on Trial: How Workplace Learning Must Reinvent Itself to Remain Relevant
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2021

1,001 Pearls of Teachers' Wisdom: Quotations on Life and Learning

1,001 Pearls of Teachers' Wisdom: Quotations on Life and Learning
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2021

PUPPY POTTY TRAINING GUIDE: The complete comprehensive guide to train your puppy on potty etiquette

PUPPY POTTY TRAINING GUIDE: The complete comprehensive guide to train your puppy on potty etiquette
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2021

Master Training Specialist: Training Analysis

In this article we will discuss the first phase of the ADDIE process: analysis and the different types of training analysis.

Let's take a look at the first phase of the ADDIE model; the Analysis phase. Below is a synopsis of the types of analysis conducted in order to design, develop, implement, and evaluate training.

Strategic Needs Assessment (SNA): Examines the external and internal factors that affect performance within the context of an organization's business strategy and identifies gaps between the current and desired conditions. This type of analysis works best when analyzing organizational goals. For instance, a cutter might need a SNA before deploying to a new arena to ensure training requirements are met.

Front End Analysis (FEA): There are two

types of FEA: New Performance Planning (NPP) and Diagnostics.

New Performance Planning (NPP) is conducted when the Coast Guard acquires a new system and needs to deliver training on that system.

For instance, a new radar system is developed by Lockheed Martin and requires new test gear, IETMs, and procedures to troubleshoot.

During the Acquisition process, the Defense Acquisition Office would require a FEA and training to be developed.

Diagnostics FEA is accomplished when there is an increase in CASREPS, mishaps reports and/or maintenance issues on existing equipment that might require training.

Job Task Analysis (JTA) is accomplished to document the duties and task of a specific rank and rating. JTA documents what we do every day; it is what our jobs entail. For instance, a First Class Operations Specialist has a duty to troubleshoot electronic equipment. The task (level 1) to support this duty would include operation of various test equipment. JTA data is routinely collected and updated; it directly links to the learning objectives of technical training. Also, JTA data is acceptable for American Council on Education (ACE) accreditation.

Training Requirements Analysis (TRA) examines the current worksite analysis and develops a training program based on existing training programs.

For instance, if a Department Head (DH)

notices that evaluation writing is declining within the department, the DH may direct all personnel to complete the effective writing e-learning program available online.

Occupational Analysis (OA) takes a snapshot of a specific rank and rate. This is different than JTA in that OA does not look for specific duties and tasks but captures "the whole picture" for a guardian's task. This whole picture includes collateral duties and duties outside a worker's normal duties.

OA data is evaluated every 3 years for

technical ratings and every 4 years for non technical rating. This data is used in developing and revising Personal Qualification Standards, staffing, training requirements, and performance standards.

Cost Analysis is divided into three different

types: Cost Comparison Analysis (CCA), Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA), and Return on Investment (ROI). Cost Analysis is generally conducted along with or as a result of other analysis techniques.

Cost Comparison Analysis (CCA) compares

various training delivery methods, such as distance learning vs. classroom, hands-on Technical Training Equipment (TTE) vs. simulations, and which training site(s) should conduct training.

Cost Analysis (CA) is much like CCA; however, it calculates a "bang for the buck" method.

CA helps to decide the initial cost and outcome of the training.

Return on Investment (ROI) can only be

conducted when a monetary value is assigned to the benefits of training. For instance, if training is implemented on repairing a specific piece of equipment which is normally repaired by Interactive Multimedia Instruction (IMI), then the ROI can be computed.

Many types of analysis occur with training, and no single type of analysis is a stand-alone product.

Collecting NPP data should be done in conjunction with a CA. In another situation a diagnostic FEA may lead to an OA and a CA.

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