10 Best Ccna Video Training

Updated on: May 2021

Best Ccna Video Training in 2021


CCNA Collaboration Official Cert Guide Library (Exams CICD 210-060 and CIVND 210-065)

CCNA Collaboration Official Cert Guide Library (Exams CICD 210-060 and CIVND 210-065)
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2021
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CCNA 200-301 Official Cert Guide, Volume 1

CCNA 200-301 Official Cert Guide, Volume 1
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2021

CCNA Collaboration CIVND 210-065 Official Cert Guide

CCNA Collaboration CIVND 210-065 Official Cert Guide
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2021
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CCNA Cyber Ops SECFND #210-250 Official Cert Guide (Certification Guide)

CCNA Cyber Ops SECFND #210-250 Official Cert Guide (Certification Guide)
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2021
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Cisco CCNA in 60 Days

Cisco CCNA in 60 Days
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2021

CCNA 200-301 Official Cert Guide Library

CCNA 200-301 Official Cert Guide Library
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2021

AWS Certified Solutions Architect Official Study Guide: Associate Exam (Aws Certified Solutions Architect Official: Associate Exam)

AWS Certified Solutions Architect Official Study Guide: Associate Exam (Aws Certified Solutions Architect Official: Associate Exam)
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2021
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CCNA Routing and Switching Complete Certification Kit: Exams 100 - 105, 200 - 105, 200 - 125

CCNA Routing and Switching Complete Certification Kit: Exams 100 - 105, 200 - 105, 200 - 125
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2021

CompTIA A+ Certification All-in-One Exam Guide, Tenth Edition (Exams 220-1001 & 220-1002)

CompTIA A+ Certification All-in-One Exam Guide, Tenth Edition (Exams 220-1001 & 220-1002)
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2021

CCNA Routing and Switching Complete Study Guide: Exam 100-105, Exam 200-105, Exam 200-125

CCNA Routing and Switching Complete Study Guide: Exam 100-105, Exam 200-105, Exam 200-125
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2021
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The Cult @ the Fillmore, San Francisco

The Cult recently reunited for a reunion tour. I was able to obtain a press pass to the tour's kickoff in San Francisco. This was my take on the show.

I've collected their oldest recordings on vinyl and anything rare I could find, and I've loved Ian Astbury to an indescribable degree. I love their old Southern Death Cult and Death Cult stuff, and seeing old videos of them in their first stages in England during the up rise of UK punk was completely surreal to me because they were so different from all the bands of that time. It was a bizarrely accurate foreshadowing of who they are today. They really took a chance. While other bands were sporting spikes and short hair, and all the trappings of what would later widely become known as punk style, Ian Astbury was already looking like a Native American gothic, not fitting any previously known mold.

I got my first tattoo at 15, of a symbol I took off a Death Cult single, "God's Zoo," because I knew I would love them forever; and I was completely right about this. I saw them at the Fillmore a few years ago and I can't remember that show very well, so I wasn't expecting to be blown away by this show. This "Return to the Wild" tour is a reunion of sorts, since apparently guitarist Billy Duffy and singer Ian Astbury have had problems with one another in the past. What I saw and how I felt at this show was not at all what I expected. I thought this would be the last tour that I'd even be interested in seeing. I figured because they have been at it so long, and have had a tumultuous relationship, they would undoubtedly end up going downhill. I was wrong.

After seeing this show, I absolutely know that if Ian and Billy can get along, they have a lot more in store for their fans, and it will not be disappointing. They have something that most bands just don't have… not only are they talented and totally rock, but they have unique qualities in their songs and delivery that I rarely see in other bands. They cannot be imitated. They have Ian's uniquely haunting vocals going for them, and the spiritual quality of their songs, which never comes off as hokey or religious, just spiritual… period. When you combine those qualities with the ability to rock and roll as hard as some of the best rock bands to have ever played music, there just isn't any way to imitate or compete with a band like The Cult.

Billy Duffy is a top-notch amazing guitar player; and their new players- a guitarist (whose name I don't know), bassist Chris Wyse (Jerry Cantrell, Ozzy Osbourne), and drummer John Tempesta (White Zombie, Helmet), are all top caliber as well. I was particularly impressed with this drummer. He was just amazing… hard driving and accurate, with non-stop energy. I also thought he was damn good looking (similar to Chris Cornell of Sound Garden)!

The show was incredible because they sounded perfect throughout, and they hadn't lost any of their edge. I heard that they only rehearsed for 2 weeks, but it sounded like they'd been playing together for a long time; like when a band is so tight that everything seems completely effortless. The crowd ate it up the whole time.

Ian came out in a camouflage bomber jacket, distressed jeans, and a bandana in his hair, looking very rugged. Although in the past, his look has been a bit more polished, this rugged look really works for him too. He looked comfortable in his own skin (even though he proclaimed onstage that his "trousers are too tight"). I thought he looked really hot, even though he's bigger than he used to be. Billy Duffy looked the same as ever, and proved once again that he has perfected being a guitar god.

They did an accomplished sampling of older and newer songs, never compromising the energy level of the overall show. They slowed it down a bit midway when Billy played acoustic while he and Ian sat on stools to do 'Edie' sans the band, which was beautiful and admiringly received. Their newer songs (from The Cult, Beyond Good and Evil) are much harder than all the previous material (Dreamtime, Love, Electric, Sonic Temple, amp; Ceremony); and performed live, I loved all of it.

When they played 'Rain,' I felt tears starting to come, not just because I love the song, but also because I felt so lucky to be there to experience it. As I'm beginning to grow up (which has admittedly taken me a while), I've begun to truly appreciate moments like these for the first time. Instead of just going along living my life and taking everything for granted as I have in the past, I occasionally remember to take notice and try to realize that this particular moment that I'm experiencing is incredible, and it won't happen again. I wish I would have been mature enough to realize this earlier on, as I've seen some amazing shows that I had fun at, but can't remember. Sometimes something traumatic has to happen for one to come to this realization. Other times, something might literally have to knock you in the head to remind you that you are there in that moment. That's what happened to me right at that very moment…

As tears began to come, a piece of Ian's tambourine hit me in the head! The tears stopped, as I realized the piece of tambourine was somewhere on the ground around me. I managed to find it, and now I have something tangible to help me remember that moment forever. That and the scar…! No, it did cause a tiny abrasion and sore head, but nothing permanent!

I managed to force my way to the second row of bodies, and had to endure a crew of giant guys (footballer types) knocking into me, but I had to stay put because I was so close. The floor was continually bouncing and shaking, and it reminded me of the time I was in the front row at one of their stadium shows; probably around 1990 or 91, and the floor was shaking in the same exact way. (I remember I was banging my head so much, shaking my hair around, that my neck hurt for days after that show!) One of the giant guys spilled his stinky beer all over me, and another elbowed me in the chest, causing chest pain the following day. It was all worth it though. At the end of the show, I got a copy of the set list from the stage crew.

They played many favorites, like She Sells Sanctuary, Peace Dog, etc... When they came out for their encore, Ian said the "last 2 songs are for the big guys." I'm telling you, it was like there was a football team in the front row; and they were really rowdy. It didn't help that the last 2 songs were 'Fire Woman' and 'Love Removal Machine,' which are both fast, rocking favorites.

After the show, since I had a photo pass (which is better than nothing), I went to the upstairs area; where I figured it was worth a shot trying to meet this man whom I've admired since well before I was of legal age to get him to look at me. The awful woman at the backstage door was about 50 years old with Fire Engine Red hair, styled in an outdated way that a 50-year old would style it. (She was attempting to look edgy, but just looked like a sad grandma.) Anyway, I asked her if my pass could get me back, and she of course said no, so I walked off very agreeably. I saw James Hetfield, the Metallica singer hanging around, and later The Cult Drummer, Johnny came out and I told him I thought he was incredible. I wish I would have talked to him longer, but I began to mill about.

I then actually agreed to stop and talk with these 3 old men who were circling me. They continually persisted that I sit down with them, and I continually refused. It turns out that one of them did the artwork of a stylized wolf, that the band is using for their backdrop, flyers, and current live recordings which you can buy right after the concert ends. The artist guy was the nicest one of them and the least drunk. His friends were drunk and obnoxious, and they were very self-important, proclaiming that they would get me backstage. I have always done better on my own than with any guys around when it comes to almost everything, but especially in regard to meeting bands. I should have immediately gotten away from them.

Instead, I let them spout their drunken dribble at me for a few minutes, and one of them told me it was his birthday and then he put his backstage pass sticker on my shirt and tried to walk me over to the area where that door was. Security saw him do this, and I said, "Hey, you saw him give me this and that I didn't ask for it, right? Is that okay?" and the guy said, "Yeah, you can go in, but he can't now." Then something happened really fast and loud… they knocked him into a table and chair in a corner, pretty hard, and it appeared the guy was hurt. He didn't get up. Everyone backed up and stood there staring. Then that yucky old backstage guard woman walked up to me and told me that I needed to leave.

That was totally ridiculous. I didn't do anything shady at all, I was completely respectful of the security and everyone around me, and I have no idea why they knocked that guy onto the floor. I don't like scenes though, and said, "Fine, this is too much drama for me." Then a security guy asked for the pass back from me. I said no problem and peeled it off, then asked, " Oh, could I keep it as a souvenir?" And he said… and this kills me… "No, I need to give it back to him because he's staying," in reference to the guy they knocked out, who was still on the floor (maybe with a broken leg) after 10 minutes! Also, as I mentioned, this guy was totally drunk. I was sober and respectful and didn't do anything wrong, and they wanted the drunk guy who they had just beaten up to have a backstage pass. I'm sure The Cult would rather have those sort of people backstage to meet them than myself - a long time fan, writer, and (I've been told) a pretty blonde girl. C'est La Vie. My night at The Cult was thoroughly enjoyable. They rekindled something in me that I thought might have been lost, and in addition to having a good time, it made me think about a thing or two. I still want to meet Ian Astbury… and I'd like to think he wouldn't mind meeting me either. I'd have loved to see video footage of those 3 drunken old guys backstage with them… but that was not meant to be.

For more on the The Cult's Tour, www.thecult.us

For anyone who follows popular rock music from the eighties until now, The Cult is a band that you undoubtedly know and respect. For me, it goes way beyond that. I've loved them since I can remember, and have always had a voracious appetite for their music. I've been a fan since I first became aware of them at 14 years old, around 1987. I've seen almost every tour they've done since then. I've seen them with Billy Idol, Guns and Roses and Bonham, Metallica, Lenny Kravitz, and on their own.

I've collected their oldest recordings on vinyl and anything rare I could find, and I've loved Ian Astbury to an indescribable degree. I love their old Southern Death Cult and Death Cult stuff, and seeing old videos of them in their first stages in England during the up rise of UK punk was completely surreal to me because they were so different from all the bands of that time. It was a bizarrely accurate foreshadowing of who they are today. They really took a chance. While other bands were sporting spikes and short hair, and all the trappings of what would later widely become known as punk style, Ian Astbury was already looking like a Native American gothic, not fitting any previously known mold.

I got my first tattoo at 15, of a symbol I took off a Death Cult single, "God's Zoo," because I knew I would love them forever; and I was completely right about this. I saw them at the Fillmore a few years ago and I can't remember that show very well, so I wasn't expecting to be blown away by this show. This "Return to the Wild" tour is a reunion of sorts, since apparently guitarist Billy Duffy and singer Ian Astbury have had problems with one another in the past. What I saw and how I felt at this show was not at all what I expected. I thought this would be the last tour that I'd even be interested in seeing. I figured because they have been at it so long, and have had a tumultuous relationship, they would undoubtedly end up going downhill. I was wrong.

After seeing this show, I absolutely know that if Ian and Billy can get along, they have a lot more in store for their fans, and it will not be disappointing. They have something that most bands just don't have… not only are they talented and totally rock, but they have unique qualities in their songs and delivery that I rarely see in other bands. They cannot be imitated. They have Ian's uniquely haunting vocals going for them, and the spiritual quality of their songs, which never comes off as hokey or religious, just spiritual… period. When you combine those qualities with the ability to rock and roll as hard as some of the best rock bands to have ever played music, there just isn't any way to imitate or compete with a band like The Cult.

Billy Duffy is a top-notch amazing guitar player; and their new players- a guitarist (whose name I don't know), bassist Chris Wyse (Jerry Cantrell, Ozzy Osbourne), and drummer John Tempesta (White Zombie, Helmet), are all top caliber as well. I was particularly impressed with this drummer. He was just amazing… hard driving and accurate, with non-stop energy. I also thought he was damn good looking (similar to Chris Cornell of Sound Garden)!

The show was incredible because they sounded perfect throughout, and they hadn't lost any of their edge. I heard that they only rehearsed for 2 weeks, but it sounded like they'd been playing together for a long time; like when a band is so tight that everything seems completely effortless. The crowd ate it up the whole time.

Ian came out in a camouflage bomber jacket, distressed jeans, and a bandana in his hair, looking very rugged. Although in the past, his look has been a bit more polished, this rugged look really works for him too. He looked comfortable in his own skin (even though he proclaimed onstage that his "trousers are too tight"). I thought he looked really hot, even though he's bigger than he used to be. Billy Duffy looked the same as ever, and proved once again that he has perfected being a guitar god.

They did an accomplished sampling of older and newer songs, never compromising the energy level of the overall show. They slowed it down a bit midway when Billy played acoustic while he and Ian sat on stools to do 'Edie' sans the band, which was beautiful and admiringly received. Their newer songs (from The Cult, Beyond Good and Evil) are much harder than all the previous material (Dreamtime, Love, Electric, Sonic Temple, amp; Ceremony); and performed live, I loved all of it.

When they played 'Rain,' I felt tears starting to come, not just because I love the song, but also because I felt so lucky to be there to experience it. As I'm beginning to grow up (which has admittedly taken me a while), I've begun to truly appreciate moments like these for the first time. Instead of just going along living my life and taking everything for granted as I have in the past, I occasionally remember to take notice and try to realize that this particular moment that I'm experiencing is incredible, and it won't happen again. I wish I would have been mature enough to realize this earlier on, as I've seen some amazing shows that I had fun at, but can't remember. Sometimes something traumatic has to happen for one to come to this realization. Other times, something might literally have to knock you in the head to remind you that you are there in that moment. That's what happened to me right at that very moment…

As tears began to come, a piece of Ian's tambourine hit me in the head! The tears stopped, as I realized the piece of tambourine was somewhere on the ground around me. I managed to find it, and now I have something tangible to help me remember that moment forever. That and the scar…! No, it did cause a tiny abrasion and sore head, but nothing permanent!

I managed to force my way to the second row of bodies, and had to endure a crew of giant guys (footballer types) knocking into me, but I had to stay put because I was so close. The floor was continually bouncing and shaking, and it reminded me of the time I was in the front row at one of their stadium shows; probably around 1990 or 91, and the floor was shaking in the same exact way. (I remember I was banging my head so much, shaking my hair around, that my neck hurt for days after that show!) One of the giant guys spilled his stinky beer all over me, and another elbowed me in the chest, causing chest pain the following day. It was all worth it though. At the end of the show, I got a copy of the set list from the stage crew.

They played many favorites, like She Sells Sanctuary, Peace Dog, etc... When they came out for their encore, Ian said the "last 2 songs are for the big guys." I'm telling you, it was like there was a football team in the front row; and they were really rowdy. It didn't help that the last 2 songs were 'Fire Woman' and 'Love Removal Machine,' which are both fast, rocking favorites.

After the show, since I had a photo pass (which is better than nothing), I went to the upstairs area; where I figured it was worth a shot trying to meet this man whom I've admired since well before I was of legal age to get him to look at me. The awful woman at the backstage door was about 50 years old with Fire Engine Red hair, styled in an outdated way that a 50-year old would style it. (She was attempting to look edgy, but just looked like a sad grandma.) Anyway, I asked her if my pass could get me back, and she of course said no, so I walked off very agreeably. I saw James Hetfield, the Metallica singer hanging around, and later The Cult Drummer, Johnny came out and I told him I thought he was incredible. I wish I would have talked to him longer, but I began to mill about.

I then actually agreed to stop and talk with these 3 old men who were circling me. They continually persisted that I sit down with them, and I continually refused. It turns out that one of them did the artwork of a stylized wolf, that the band is using for their backdrop, flyers, and current live recordings which you can buy right after the concert ends. The artist guy was the nicest one of them and the least drunk. His friends were drunk and obnoxious, and they were very self-important, proclaiming that they would get me backstage. I have always done better on my own than with any guys around when it comes to almost everything, but especially in regard to meeting bands. I should have immediately gotten away from them.

Instead, I let them spout their drunken dribble at me for a few minutes, and one of them told me it was his birthday and then he put his backstage pass sticker on my shirt and tried to walk me over to the area where that door was. Security saw him do this, and I said, "Hey, you saw him give me this and that I didn't ask for it, right? Is that okay?" and the guy said, "Yeah, you can go in, but he can't now." Then something happened really fast and loud… they knocked him into a table and chair in a corner, pretty hard, and it appeared the guy was hurt. He didn't get up. Everyone backed up and stood there staring. Then that yucky old backstage guard woman walked up to me and told me that I needed to leave.

That was totally ridiculous. I didn't do anything shady at all, I was completely respectful of the security and everyone around me, and I have no idea why they knocked that guy onto the floor. I don't like scenes though, and said, "Fine, this is too much drama for me." Then a security guy asked for the pass back from me. I said no problem and peeled it off, then asked, " Oh, could I keep it as a souvenir?" And he said… and this kills me… "No, I need to give it back to him because he's staying," in reference to the guy they knocked out, who was still on the floor (maybe with a broken leg) after 10 minutes! Also, as I mentioned, this guy was totally drunk. I was sober and respectful and didn't do anything wrong, and they wanted the drunk guy who they had just beaten up to have a backstage pass. I'm sure The Cult would rather have those sort of people backstage to meet them than myself - a long time fan, writer, and (I've been told) a pretty blonde girl. C'est La Vie. My night at The Cult was thoroughly enjoyable. They rekindled something in me that I thought might have been lost, and in addition to having a good time, it made me think about a thing or two. I still want to meet Ian Astbury… and I'd like to think he wouldn't mind meeting me either. I'd have loved to see video footage of those 3 drunken old guys backstage with them… but that was not meant to be.

For more on the The Cult's Tour, www.thecult.us

For anyone who follows popular rock music from the eighties until now, The Cult is a band that you undoubtedly know and respect. For me, it goes way beyond that. I've loved them since I can remember, and have always had a voracious appetite for their music. I've been a fan since I first became aware of them at 14 years old, around 1987. I've seen almost every tour they've done since then. I've seen them with Billy Idol, Guns and Roses and Bonham, Metallica, Lenny Kravitz, and on their own.

I've collected their oldest recordings on vinyl and anything rare I could find, and I've loved Ian Astbury to an indescribable degree. I love their old Southern Death Cult and Death Cult stuff, and seeing old videos of them in their first stages in England during the up rise of UK punk was completely surreal to me because they were so different from all the bands of that time. It was a bizarrely accurate foreshadowing of who they are today. They really took a chance. While other bands were sporting spikes and short hair, and all the trappings of what would later widely become known as punk style, Ian Astbury was already looking like a Native American gothic, not fitting any previously known mold.

I got my first tattoo at 15, of a symbol I took off a Death Cult single, "God's Zoo," because I knew I would love them forever; and I was completely right about this. I saw them at the Fillmore a few years ago and I can't remember that show very well, so I wasn't expecting to be blown away by this show. This "Return to the Wild" tour is a reunion of sorts, since apparently guitarist Billy Duffy and singer Ian Astbury have had problems with one another in the past. What I saw and how I felt at this show was not at all what I expected. I thought this would be the last tour that I'd even be interested in seeing. I figured because they have been at it so long, and have had a tumultuous relationship, they would undoubtedly end up going downhill. I was wrong.

After seeing this show, I absolutely know that if Ian and Billy can get along, they have a lot more in store for their fans, and it will not be disappointing. They have something that most bands just don't have… not only are they talented and totally rock, but they have unique qualities in their songs and delivery that I rarely see in other bands. They cannot be imitated. They have Ian's uniquely haunting vocals going for them, and the spiritual quality of their songs, which never comes off as hokey or religious, just spiritual… period. When you combine those qualities with the ability to rock and roll as hard as some of the best rock bands to have ever played music, there just isn't any way to imitate or compete with a band like The Cult.

Billy Duffy is a top-notch amazing guitar player; and their new players- a guitarist (whose name I don't know), bassist Chris Wyse (Jerry Cantrell, Ozzy Osbourne), and drummer John Tempesta (White Zombie, Helmet), are all top caliber as well. I was particularly impressed with this drummer. He was just amazing… hard driving and accurate, with non-stop energy. I also thought he was damn good looking (similar to Chris Cornell of Sound Garden)!

The show was incredible because they sounded perfect throughout, and they hadn't lost any of their edge. I heard that they only rehearsed for 2 weeks, but it sounded like they'd been playing together for a long time; like when a band is so tight that everything seems completely effortless. The crowd ate it up the whole time.

Ian came out in a camouflage bomber jacket, distressed jeans, and a bandana in his hair, looking very rugged. Although in the past, his look has been a bit more polished, this rugged look really works for him too. He looked comfortable in his own skin (even though he proclaimed onstage that his "trousers are too tight"). I thought he looked really hot, even though he's bigger than he used to be. Billy Duffy looked the same as ever, and proved once again that he has perfected being a guitar god.

They did an accomplished sampling of older and newer songs, never compromising the energy level of the overall show. They slowed it down a bit midway when Billy played acoustic while he and Ian sat on stools to do 'Edie' sans the band, which was beautiful and admiringly received. Their newer songs (from The Cult, Beyond Good and Evil) are much harder than all the previous material (Dreamtime, Love, Electric, Sonic Temple, amp; Ceremony); and performed live, I loved all of it.

When they played 'Rain,' I felt tears starting to come, not just because I love the song, but also because I felt so lucky to be there to experience it. As I'm beginning to grow up (which has admittedly taken me a while), I've begun to truly appreciate moments like these for the first time. Instead of just going along living my life and taking everything for granted as I have in the past, I occasionally remember to take notice and try to realize that this particular moment that I'm experiencing is incredible, and it won't happen again. I wish I would have been mature enough to realize this earlier on, as I've seen some amazing shows that I had fun at, but can't remember. Sometimes something traumatic has to happen for one to come to this realization. Other times, something might literally have to knock you in the head to remind you that you are there in that moment. That's what happened to me right at that very moment…

As tears began to come, a piece of Ian's tambourine hit me in the head! The tears stopped, as I realized the piece of tambourine was somewhere on the ground around me. I managed to find it, and now I have something tangible to help me remember that moment forever. That and the scar…! No, it did cause a tiny abrasion and sore head, but nothing permanent!

I managed to force my way to the second row of bodies, and had to endure a crew of giant guys (footballer types) knocking into me, but I had to stay put because I was so close. The floor was continually bouncing and shaking, and it reminded me of the time I was in the front row at one of their stadium shows; probably around 1990 or 91, and the floor was shaking in the same exact way. (I remember I was banging my head so much, shaking my hair around, that my neck hurt for days after that show!) One of the giant guys spilled his stinky beer all over me, and another elbowed me in the chest, causing chest pain the following day. It was all worth it though. At the end of the show, I got a copy of the set list from the stage crew.

They played many favorites, like She Sells Sanctuary, Peace Dog, etc... When they came out for their encore, Ian said the "last 2 songs are for the big guys." I'm telling you, it was like there was a football team in the front row; and they were really rowdy. It didn't help that the last 2 songs were 'Fire Woman' and 'Love Removal Machine,' which are both fast, rocking favorites.

After the show, since I had a photo pass (which is better than nothing), I went to the upstairs area; where I figured it was worth a shot trying to meet this man whom I've admired since well before I was of legal age to get him to look at me. The awful woman at the backstage door was about 50 years old with Fire Engine Red hair, styled in an outdated way that a 50-year old would style it. (She was attempting to look edgy, but just looked like a sad grandma.) Anyway, I asked her if my pass could get me back, and she of course said no, so I walked off very agreeably. I saw James Hetfield, the Metallica singer hanging around, and later The Cult Drummer, Johnny came out and I told him I thought he was incredible. I wish I would have talked to him longer, but I began to mill about.

I then actually agreed to stop and talk with these 3 old men who were circling me. They continually persisted that I sit down with them, and I continually refused. It turns out that one of them did the artwork of a stylized wolf, that the band is using for their backdrop, flyers, and current live recordings which you can buy right after the concert ends. The artist guy was the nicest one of them and the least drunk. His friends were drunk and obnoxious, and they were very self-important, proclaiming that they would get me backstage. I have always done better on my own than with any guys around when it comes to almost everything, but especially in regard to meeting bands. I should have immediately gotten away from them.

Instead, I let them spout their drunken dribble at me for a few minutes, and one of them told me it was his birthday and then he put his backstage pass sticker on my shirt and tried to walk me over to the area where that door was. Security saw him do this, and I said, "Hey, you saw him give me this and that I didn't ask for it, right? Is that okay?" and the guy said, "Yeah, you can go in, but he can't now." Then something happened really fast and loud… they knocked him into a table and chair in a corner, pretty hard, and it appeared the guy was hurt. He didn't get up. Everyone backed up and stood there staring. Then that yucky old backstage guard woman walked up to me and told me that I needed to leave.

That was totally ridiculous. I didn't do anything shady at all, I was completely respectful of the security and everyone around me, and I have no idea why they knocked that guy onto the floor. I don't like scenes though, and said, "Fine, this is too much drama for me." Then a security guy asked for the pass back from me. I said no problem and peeled it off, then asked, " Oh, could I keep it as a souvenir?" And he said… and this kills me… "No, I need to give it back to him because he's staying," in reference to the guy they knocked out, who was still on the floor (maybe with a broken leg) after 10 minutes! Also, as I mentioned, this guy was totally drunk. I was sober and respectful and didn't do anything wrong, and they wanted the drunk guy who they had just beaten up to have a backstage pass.

I'm sure The Cult would rather have those sort of people backstage to meet them than myself - a long time fan, writer, and (I've been told) a pretty blonde girl. C'est La Vie. My night at The Cult was thoroughly enjoyable. They rekindled something in me that I thought might have been lost, and in addition to having a good time, it made me think about a thing or two. I still want to meet Ian Astbury… and I'd like to think he wouldn't mind meeting me either. I'd have loved to see video footage of those 3 drunken old guys backstage with them… but that was not meant to be.

For more on the The Cult's Tour, www.thecult.us