10 Best Flight Simulator For Private Pilot Training

Updated on: October 2021

Best Flight Simulator For Private Pilot Training in 2021


The Student Pilot's Flight Manual: From First Flight to Pilot Certificate (Kershner Flight Manual Series)

The Student Pilot's Flight Manual: From First Flight to Pilot Certificate (Kershner Flight Manual Series)
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2021

Scenario-Based Training with X-Plane and Microsoft Flight Simulator: Using PC-Based Flight Simulations Based on FAA-Industry Training Standards

Scenario-Based Training with X-Plane and Microsoft Flight Simulator: Using PC-Based Flight Simulations Based on FAA-Industry Training Standards
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2021

Private Pilot Practical Test Standards for Airplane (SEL, MEL, SES, MES), Plus 500 free US military manuals and US Army field manuals when you sample this book

Private Pilot Practical Test Standards for Airplane (SEL, MEL, SES, MES), Plus 500 free US military manuals and US Army field manuals when you sample this book
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2021

Helicopter Flying Handbook (Federal Aviation Administration): FAA-H-8083-21A

Helicopter Flying Handbook (Federal Aviation Administration): FAA-H-8083-21A
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2021

Private Pilot Practical Test Standards for Powered Parachute (PPL and PPS) and Weight Shift Control (WSCL and WSCS)

Private Pilot Practical Test Standards for Powered Parachute (PPL and PPS) and Weight Shift Control (WSCL and WSCS)
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2021

CH Products Pro Pedals USB Flight Simulator Pedals (300-111)

CH Products Pro Pedals USB Flight Simulator Pedals (300-111)
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2021
  • 3 Axis of Control: X & Y axis for left and right toe brake control and Z axis for self centering sliding mechanism for rudder control
  • Realistic heel-toe differential brake control and Large, sturdy base with 7 foot USB cable
  • Locking rudder axis for gas/brake emulation for racing games. It is only compatible with CH USB devices
  • Plug and Play driverless USB installation for both PC and Macintosh
  • Compatible with Windows 98, 2000, XP, Vista, 7, 8, 10 and Mac OSX

Airplane Flying Handbook: ASA FAA-H-8083-3B

Airplane Flying Handbook: ASA FAA-H-8083-3B
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2021
  • Effective 2016
  • 352 pages

Private Pilot Practical Test Standards for Rotorcraft (Helicopter, Gyroplane), Plus 500 free US military manuals and US Army field manuals when you sample this book

Private Pilot Practical Test Standards for Rotorcraft (Helicopter, Gyroplane), Plus 500 free US military manuals and US Army field manuals when you sample this book
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2021

Private Pilot Practical Test Standards for Glider, Plus 500 free US military manuals and US Army field manuals when you sample this book

Private Pilot Practical Test Standards for Glider, Plus 500 free US military manuals and US Army field manuals when you sample this book
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2021

Private Pilot Practical Test Standards for Lighter-Than-Air (Balloon, Airship), Plus 500 free US military manuals and US Army field manuals when you sample this book

Private Pilot Practical Test Standards for Lighter-Than-Air (Balloon, Airship), Plus 500 free US military manuals and US Army field manuals when you sample this book
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2021

The History and Facts: Flight Simulators

Flight simulators also have an interesting history. The history of flight simulator helped build the technologically advanced product that is used today.

During World War I the first edition of a flight simulator was produced and used. The equipment was originally developed to teach new pilots to fire machine guns. They were also trained on how to lead targets, or learn how to aim their weapon ahead of the target so that the ammo will land on the designated mark. One of the very first simulation devices was called the Link Trainer and was developed by Edwin Link in Binghamton, New York. However, this edition became ineffective to the Civil Aviation. They then switched over to the simulator called the Celestial Navigation Trainer in 1941. This simulator was preferred because of its size and its ability to seat an entire bomber crew so they could learn how to fly missions.

As technology changed, so did the flight simulators. In the 1940's analog computers became available to solve the equations used during flight, which started the rise to the first computer simulation. Due to the new technologies, Curtiss-Wright developed the first full flight simulator in 1948. The simulator was supposed to represent the Pan American Stratocruiser. When it was first used and created, there was no movement or simulated external view. Even still, the entire cabin and their instruments functioned and the crew found it very effective at that time. There was continued growth through the 1950's which allowed for movement and new systems.

The digital representations for flight simulators were later used in the 1960's. In 1972 the collimated visual systems advanced the reality of a pilot's point of view for distant visual scenes. However, these systems were only bound to cross-cockpit viewing capacity. Eventually, Rediffusion Company announced the Wide Angle Infinity Display Equipment (WAIDE) system that allowed viewing in distant-focus in seamless projection for both pilots as they sat side-by-side. Simulators have been a helpful tool for flight training for the commercial, personal and military aircrafts and are currently still in production and use by the aviation industry to enhance training for all aviation practices.

Today, there are multiple different types of trainers/simulators that are used for aviation students. Part Task Trainers (PTT) which cover one or more aircraft system and the Full Flight Simulators (FFS) that has a comprehensive aerodynamic and systems modeling are just two of the possible devices. There is also a Cockpit Procedure Trainer which is used to practice emergency checklists and cockpit familiarization; as well as the Aviation Training Device, which is used for flight concepts and procedures training; the Basic Instrument Training Device, which is primarily focused on generic instrument flight procedures; the Full Flight Simulator which is a training device for specific aircraft flight training; and the Flight and Navigation Procedures Trainer which is used for generic flight training.

Training in a simulator before the actual aircraft gives both the student pilot and instructor plenty of time to intimately learn the controls and avionics of the Cirrus. Being well educated in a flight simulator can help the pilot gain confidence during his or her training that will benefit them in a career as an aviator.

Wilson Richards is an expert of Cirrus aircrafts. He is a pilot and is affiliated with Coast Flight Training- a flight training school in San Diego, California. He helps in developing potential students to become professional pilots in the future.

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