10 Best Medical Sales Training Programs

Updated on: February 2021

Best Medical Sales Training Programs in 2021


RMSR - Medical Sales Training Program Education Manual

RMSR - Medical Sales Training Program Education Manual
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2021

Nutrient Power: Heal Your Biochemistry and Heal Your Brain

Nutrient Power: Heal Your Biochemistry and Heal Your Brain
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2021

American Medical Association Manual of Style : A Guide for Authors and Editors (AMA)

American Medical Association Manual of Style : A Guide for Authors and Editors (AMA)
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2021
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Medical Terminology: The Best and Most Effective Way to Memorize, Pronounce and Understand Medical Terms: Second Edition

Medical Terminology: The Best and Most Effective Way to Memorize, Pronounce and Understand Medical Terms: Second Edition
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2021

Working Stiff: Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner

Working Stiff: Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2021

Myers' Psychology for AP®

Myers' Psychology for AP®
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2021
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HypnoBirthing, Fourth Edition: The breakthrough natural approach to safer, easier, more comfortable birthing - The Mongan Method, 4th Edition

HypnoBirthing, Fourth Edition: The breakthrough natural approach to safer, easier, more comfortable birthing - The Mongan Method, 4th Edition
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2021

The Accelerated Learning Handbook: A Creative Guide to Designing and Delivering Faster, More Effective Training Programs

The Accelerated Learning Handbook: A Creative Guide to Designing and Delivering Faster, More Effective Training Programs
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2021

From Fearful to Fear Free: A Positive Program to Free Your Dog from Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias

From Fearful to Fear Free: A Positive Program to Free Your Dog from Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2021

The New Power Program: Protocols for Maximum Strength

The New Power Program: Protocols for Maximum Strength
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2021
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Dog Killed at Cleveland Clinic for Sales Demo

A neurosurgeon caused an aneurysm in the brain of a mixed-breed dog in the name of medical salesmanship.

A whistle blower alerted PETA, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, that medical-device maker Micrus Corporation was requiring it's employees to attend a dog lab. According to the statement on PETA's website, the whistle blower's claims were validated and letter's were faxed to both the Cleveland Clinic and Micrus Corporation to halt the dog lab. Their efforts were unsuccessful and the dog lab continued forward. Reports indicate that approximately two dozen Micrus Corp. salesmen watched the demonstration and several participated with the exercise. The animal was placed under anesthesia during the procedure. Afterwords, the dog was then euthenized.

Micrus Corporation manufactures silicone aneurysm coils. Doctors thread the coils through a catheter to the aneurysm site, packing the aneurysm with enough coils to stop blood flow. This system is believed to be a less-invasive means then surgery for the treatment of brain aneurysms. According to The Plain Dealer when an official from Micrus Corp. was questioned about the incident, the representative had no knowledge of the procedure and was quoted "Are you sure you have the right company?"

PETA's website posted The Cleveland Clinics statement:

"It is our policy to carefully evaluate non-animal alternatives and the minimal use of animals. As an academic medical center, Cleveland Clinic does not allow procedures with animals for the sole purpose of sales training. The situation that occurred yesterday was unauthorized and not in compliance with our policy. Cleveland Clinic officials today notified the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) of the incident. Further, we are conducting an internal review of the matter. We will also be providing physician training and education to prevent this from happening in the future."

Ohio revised code dictates that animal shelters may sell impounded unclaimed dogs for $3 to non-profit organizations for the use of teaching and experiments. The code also dictates that the animals should be used for research and treatment of diseases. This dog lab was not research or treatment of disease, rather a sales pitch on how their product works. Reports indicate that the animal was purchased from a licensed vendor. Licensed vendors are required to be licensed by the USDA and adhere to the Animal Welfare Act.

PETA is urging the public to email the Cleveland Animal Protective League, The Cleveland Clinics Animal Research Committee and Micrus Corporation to demand a full investigation of the incident and full cooperation with PETA.