10 Best Road Cycling Training Books

Updated on: October 2021

Best Road Cycling Training Books in 2021


The Cyclist's Training Bible: The World's Most Comprehensive Training Guide

The Cyclist's Training Bible: The World's Most Comprehensive Training Guide
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2021

The Bicycling Big Book of Cycling for Beginners: Everything a new cyclist needs to know to gear up and start riding

The Bicycling Big Book of Cycling for Beginners: Everything a new cyclist needs to know to gear up and start riding
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2021
  • Array

The Bicycling Guide to Complete Bicycle Maintenance & Repair: For Road & Mountain Bikes

The Bicycling Guide to Complete Bicycle Maintenance & Repair: For Road & Mountain Bikes
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2021
  • Array

The Complete Book of Road Cycling & Racing

The Complete Book of Road Cycling & Racing
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2021

The Cyclist's Training Bible

The Cyclist's Training Bible
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2021
  • Array

Bicycling Magazine's Complete Book of Road Cycling Skills : Your Guide to Riding Faster, Stronger, Longer, and Safer

Bicycling Magazine's Complete Book of Road Cycling Skills : Your Guide to Riding Faster, Stronger, Longer, and Safer
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2021
  • Array

Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body

Bigger Leaner Stronger: The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2021

How to Ride Off-Road Motorcycles: Key Skills and Advanced Training for All Off-Road, Motocross, and Dual-Sport Riders

How to Ride Off-Road Motorcycles: Key Skills and Advanced Training for All Off-Road, Motocross, and Dual-Sport Riders
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2021

Road Cycling Performance Manual

Road Cycling Performance Manual
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2021

The Cyclist's Training Diary: Your Ultimate Tool for Faster, Stronger Racing

The Cyclist's Training Diary: Your Ultimate Tool for Faster, Stronger Racing
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2021

Supercross Motorcycle Racing and Supercross BMX Racing: Similarities and Differences

A common misconception among people new to the sport of off-road motorcycle and bicycle racing is that Supercross Motorcycle Racing and Supercross BMX racing are the same thing.

First of all, there is a difference between Motocross racing and Supercross racing. Motocross racing takes place outside on tracks that are partly artificial and partly natural terrain. Supercross racing usually takes place indoors, such as in indoor football stadiums and the like outfitted with manmade tracks that have similar obstacles to outdoor dirt tracks.

Additionally, Supercross courses are smaller than those for Motocross, and the races are shorter. There are also fewer riders in Supercross events, due to the smaller tracks.

The racecourses for Supercross Motorcycle and Supercross BMX racing are different. Motorcycle tracks are made of dirt, while many BMX tracks are made of sand. BMX tracks are also shorter than motorcycle tracks. BMX tracks usually consist of a starting gate, a groomed race course with various jumps built in, and a finish line. BMX courses are banked and have flat corners.

The races themselves are also shorter for BMX, since they are run on human energy. Perhaps the main similarity between the two sports is that both require the participant to demonstrate not only speed, but handling skill. It's just that one involves motorized bikes and one doesn't.

BMX began in California in the 1970s and surged in popularity after the 1982 movie

ET, one famous scene of which featured boys riding BMX style bikes. BMX Supercross racing shares some similarities with Supercross Motorcycle racing, but it is a sport in its own right. There are amateur and professional BMX racers, just as there are amateur and professional motorcycle racers.

Supercross BMX bikes generally have 20-inch wheels with knobby tires for speed and traction. The bikes are lightweight, but sturdy, with padded frames and usually a coaster brake. To customize an off-the-shelf BMX bike for the actual sport, you would add padding to the frame's top tube stem, and the handlebar crossbar if it isn't already installed. Removing the kickstand, the chain guard, and reflector brackets minimizes the potential for injury in the event of a crash.

And while Supercross BMX is slower than Supercross Motorcycle racing, that doesn't mean it isn't dangerous. In fact, BMX racers traditionally wear the same protective gear as motorcycle racers: a safety helmet, motorcycle boots or sturdy shoes, long-sleeved shirt, long pants, knee, wrist and elbow pads, chest protectors, gloves, and goggles.

Another common misperception about Supercross BMX racing is that it is strictly a kids' sport. But that is not the case at all. A whole generation of BMX kids has had time to grow up, and they're still at it! This sport is also popular with women.

Because of the non-motorized aspect of BMX racing, parents are often more receptive to their child taking up BMX racing, at least at first. Plus, it costs much less to outfit a rider with a BMX bike and safety equipment than a custom motorcycle.

There are, however, Supercross Motorcycles that are specifically designed for children that are available from recreational retailers that sell off-road motorcycles for adults. Such stores will also have safety equipment specially sized for children. They are also likely to know where your child can take a motocross safety class, a step that is highly recommended.

Some people think of Supercross BMX racing as a sort of "little brother" sport to Supercross Motorcycle racing, but that is simply not the case. BMX racing is just as much a sport, there are professional BMX racers, and BMX racing requires a high degree of skill and training, just like off-road motorcycle racing.

Related Bestselling Lists That You Might Like